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Annotated Bibliography

Annotated Bibliography
San Francisco State University
This exemplar is an annotated bibliography, which is designed to help students gain research skills while working alongside a peer as well as myself. The assignment provides a visual component to help students better understand key steps and also how to put together the assignment itself.

Assignment using Communication and Interaction Resources

Assignment using Communication and Interaction Resources
California State University, Fresno
Radiolab has an excellent episode documenting how you would assign a price tag to nature used as a foundation for discussion. This is the introductory assignment in a climate change and environmental science class. It was formerly just a short answer response submission by individual students (file uploaded; screenshot of discussion prompt) which has now been expanded to include a discussion on Canvas that helps segway to the following week where water usage is introduced with a Jamboard (linked). This exercise engages students via three different means of communication and interaction. They listen to a podcast, reflect on their understanding and communicate that understanding in written form to the instructor and to their peers in an active discussion. They're also then subsequently engaged with a Jamboard that builds off this introductory activity, expanding the engagement tools used in this course.

Home Page Buttons

Home Page Buttons
California State University, Fresno
Graphics for homepage buttons to enhance the look and usability of the landing page for students. These were created in Canva by the instructor and include the following: Click here to begin, This way to Modules, Click Here for announcements, and Virtual Asynchronous Office.

Wellness Check Discussion

Wellness Check Discussion
California State University, Fresno
This brief weekly discussion created in the Canvas, helps facilitate a line of communication between the student and the instructor by providing a way for students to check-in. The discussion encourages them to let the instructor know how they are doing in regards to the class or just life. It helps them know that there is someone else out there that has their back and is concerned about how they are doing and lets the instructor know if there is a need to contact the student for additional assistance. In addition, the discussion can be used as a way to monitor student participation.

Peer Part Planning

Peer Part Planning
California Polytechnic State University, Pomona
The course teaches students how to best use 3D CAD modeling software. Each assignment requires a large amount of planning and forethought before starting to make a model. To help address this issue, the Peer Part Planning assignment breaks students into small groups and has them come up with a basic plan/outline for how they can approach the creation of the model.

Help Module with Diversity Survey

Help Module with Diversity Survey
California State University, Fresno
This Help Module was developed to reduce the number of questions commonly asked each semester. These include topics related to Health, Writing, and Tutoring, just to name few. Included in this module is the Student Diversity Survey, created in Google Forms, asking questions such as their Gender Pronoun and their access to technology. This allows the instructor to get a socio-economic and personal read of each student at the beginning of the term.

Syllabus Diversity Statement

Syllabus Diversity Statement
California State University, San Bernardino
This diversity statement is incorporated into the class syllabus. This statement is written specifically for students in a public administration class who work with all types of communities and community members. This statement is focused on inclusion and diversity and includes a statement that reads: "Diversity and inclusion are only obtained through understanding and empathy, while we may not agree on everything, at the end of the day, what you think, and feel is valuable to the conversation."

Welcome Start Here Module Example

Welcome Start Here Module Example
California State University, Dominguez Hills
Within the Welcome [Start Here] Module, students will find a welcome message with a voice memo from the instructor as well as supporting information that will help students succeed in the course. This includes information regarding course structure and dates, a check-in survey, the syllabus, a syllabus quiz, a Blackboard tour, steps for getting organized, an instructor bio, and a pdf with successful tools for online learning.

"Class Community" Syllabus Information and Padlet Activity

"Class Community" Syllabus Information and Padlet Activity
California State University, San Bernardino
The screenshots of the selected sections of the syllabus provide information about class expectations and guidelines as well as campus resources. Also included is a Padlet board prompting discussion of the syllabus; this activity takes the place of a syllabus quiz.

Interactive Film Review with Flipgrid

Interactive Film Review with Flipgrid
California State University, San Bernardino
Using Flipgrid, students record a 1-minute or less critique of a film and then respond to the critique of another student. The interactivity made possible through the use of Flipgrid, helps students to feel more connected as they learn about other films they may not have the opportunity to view. This example includes the original assignment and the revised assignment that utilizes Flipgrid.

Introduction Activity using Google Tour Builder

Introduction Activity using Google Tour Builder
California State University, Long Beach
This self-introduction activity was designed to highlight the diversity that exists in a seminar course. Using Google Tour Builder, students get to share where they come from and what stories they carry with them. Tour Builder allows users to visualize stories and places and integrate them into the map.

Welcome and Introduction Assignment (4.1)

Welcome and Introduction Assignment (4.1)
California State University, Northridge
This graded icebreaker activity uses Padlet as a way for students to get to know each other the first week of the course. In this introductory 'Meet and Greet' students create a post, with an optional picture, and share a little about themselves. This includes their pronouns, what they like to be called, as well as future goals. The students are asked to respond to their peers and the instructor also adds a post on the Padlet to get the conversations started.

Class Diversity Statement

Class Diversity Statement
California State University, San Bernardino
This Class Diversity Statement helps to set the tone for classes that can be difficult and controversial due to subject matter. This statement clarifies the role of both student and instructor in terms of verbal exchanges/discussions in the classroom. It also promotes proper communication etiquette, tolerance and understanding, and respect for each other. The skills learned from this activity are used beyond the classroom, helping to create a more accepting and tolerant society. This statement is reviewed together as a class to promote understanding and mutual consideration.

Active Learning using EdPuzzle

Active Learning using EdPuzzle
California State University, East Bay
Edpuzzle is an educational tool that adds interactive element to any videos as part of a learning assignment. It creates an “active learning” environment where learners become more engaged. Instead of passively watching a videos, students are asked to answer questions throughout the process. By doing so, it ensures that key components are addressed and learned.

Active Learning with TEDEd

Active Learning with TEDEd
San Jose State University
Using TEDEd to increase active learning and peer-to-peer engagement, students answer questions and participate in a discussion in a video lesson. The TEDEd lesson replaces what was previously a passive learning experience where students answered standard questions for a weekly written assignment without actively engaging with the content or with their peers.