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Structured Group Discussions Providing Roleplaying & Choice

Structured Group Discussions Providing Roleplaying & Choice
California State University, Fresno
Ryan Ditchfield, an Instructor at Fresno State, creatively organizes group discussions providing students an opportunity to self-assign themselves to a group discussion topic that interest them in his "Eyewitness Identification-FTB 159T" class. In the group discussions they have the choice to pick a role - Researcher, Eyewitness, Defense Attorney, Police Officer, Suspect, and Timekeeper and throughout the semester the students will also be changing to a different group and also change their role. This example represents student choice and group roles in discussions.

Group Annotation Discussion Using Perusall

Group Annotation Discussion Using Perusall
California State University, Bakersfield
Natalie Thompson, an Instructor from CSU Bakersfield, shares a peer to peer annotation activity using the tool Perusall where students read and annotate a scholarly article. Detailed instructions are provided for the students about the discussion requirements.

Possible Lives Mapping Activity with Accompanying Jamboard

Possible Lives Mapping Activity with Accompanying Jamboard
California State Polytechnic University, Humboldt
Loren Collins, a Faculty Development Coordinator from Cal Poly Humboldt developed an activity for faculty that could be used in their courses. The activity leads students through imagining a range of lives in different careers and mapping out how to prepare for them. Students post their "Possible Lives Maps" onto a collection of Jamboards and interact with each other by posting post-its and commenting.

Collaborative Lab Experiment

Collaborative Lab Experiment
California Maritime Academy
Professor Cynthia Trevisan, from California Maritime Academy, designed this activity for online lab students to team up with two peers to collaborate in the performance of an experiment and a lab report write up. It requires the use of simple equipment from a student lab kit, a worksheet created by the instructor, and instructor-created templates in Google Docs, Jamboard and Google Sheets.