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Asynchronous/Synchronous Student Interaction: Group Reflection Problem

Asynchronous/Synchronous Student Interaction: Group Reflection Problem
California State University, San Bernardino
The Group Reflection Problem (GRP) is an active learning activity assigned over a seven-week period; allowing for two GRPs each semester. This document provides the schedule of the GRP learning activity along with screenshots of the Blackboard assignments and a link to a Google doc template for the group write-up.

Discussion Post Assignment for Outside Engagement

Discussion Post Assignment for Outside Engagement
California State University, Fresno
Many times students request extra credit and as faculty members, we struggle to provide that. This is a weekly discussion posting on Blackboard based on the face to face lecture for that week. Having a discussion post creates an environment for students to engage freely outside the classroom. At times, I have also used this to engage students during class time and have them bring out their electronic device answer the discussion posting for attendance purposes and extra credit for that day!

Interactive Film Review with Flipgrid

Interactive Film Review with Flipgrid
California State University, San Bernardino
Using Flipgrid, students record a 1-minute or less critique of a film and then respond to the critique of another student. The interactivity made possible through the use of Flipgrid, helps students to feel more connected as they learn about other films they may not have the opportunity to view. This example includes the original assignment and the revised assignment that utilizes Flipgrid.

Using VoiceThread for Peer to Peer Engagement

Using VoiceThread for Peer to Peer Engagement
California State University, San Bernardino
As a way of engaging students in more discussion and using more of the Blackboard tools available, Voicethread was used to record lectures into several “slides.” Text, voice, as well as a YouTube video, were used to make connections to the information being presented. The screenshot shows that students responded to each other as well as to the general information. The lines between names indicate a “threaded” conversation, meaning they were talking to each other.