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"It's Just a Movie" Jamboard

"It's Just a Movie" Jamboard
California State University, Fresno
Aaron Schuelke, an Instructor at Fresno State, developed a discussion activity where students read the article "It's Just a Movie" by Greg M. Smith. They then create slides on a Google Jamboard analyzing two films of their choosing, using very brief reflections (post-its) and images from the film. They then respond to at least two classmates' work in a small group discussion on Canvas.

Accessible Homepage with Engaging Images

Accessible Homepage with Engaging Images
California State University, Fresno
Jenna Kieckhaefer, an Instructor from Fresno State, shares her Canvas Homepage which clearly shows that images are all accessible with the green Ally indicators. Images are engaging for students with clear labels for the user to navigate the course.

Active Learning Using EdPuzzle

Active Learning Using EdPuzzle
California State Polytechnic University, Pomona
Elam Marcus, an Instructor at Cal Poly Pomona, uses EdPuzzle to place interactive content into an existing video. This exercise engages students with asynchronous content as they answer questions prompts during the lecture video.

Active Learning Using PlayPosit to Learn About the Aztecs

Active Learning Using PlayPosit to Learn About the Aztecs
San Diego State University
Carlos Figueroa Beltran, Instructor from San Diego State, created a five-question video quiz using PlayPosit to learn more about one of the most outstanding civilizations of the Americas. Although little recognized, the Aztecs excelled in education, technology, and sustainability. This is an example of how they transformed their environment to build one of the greatest cities of all times.

Active Learning with TEDEd

Active Learning with TEDEd
San Jose State University
Patricia Backer, an Instructor at San Jose State University, uses TEDEd to increase active learning and peer-to-peer engagement, students answer questions and participate in a discussion in a video lesson. The TEDEd lesson replaces what was previously a passive learning experience where students answered standard questions for a weekly written assignment without actively engaging with the content or with their peers.